Madaro or Pomodoro? East Boston Voters Set to Pick Their New State Representative March 31

March 25, 2015
By
Adrian Madaro

Adrian Madaro

East Boston voters will head to the polls Tuesday to select Adrian Madaro or Joanne T. Pomodoro as their new state representative.

Madaro, 26, former chief of staff to State Rep. Carlo Basile, defeated four other candidates in a hard-fought primary March 3 to become the Democratic nominee for the seat previously held by Basile, who stepped down in January to become chief secretary in the Governor Charlie Baker Administration.

Pomodoro, 62, a social worker at Massachusetts General Hospital, is running as an Independent candidate. No Republican candidates sought the party’s nomination, leaving two candidates contending for the seat in the general election.

Following his impressive victory in the primary, Madaro has continued to campaign hard, knocking on doors and making a concerted effort to meet the

Joanne T. Pomodoro

Joanne T. Pomodoro

voters and discuss issues. He will host a major fundraiser Thursday night at Spinelli’s.

Though political observers consider Madaro the favorite in heavily Democratic East Boston –  and  Pomodoro concedes that she is the underdog heading into Tuesday – he is taking nothing for granted.

“I’m not being complacent,” said Madaro. “I take nothing for granted and I’m going to work on this until the end. I haven’t taken a day off from the campaign. My job at this point is to earn the votes of the residents of East Boston for March 31.”

Madaro said he was humbled to receive the Democratic nomination in a strong field of candidates. He received the endorsement of former candidates Joe Ruggiero, Ed Deveau, Louis Scapicchio, and Camilo Hernandez at a unity breakfast that was also attended by Mayor Martin J. Walsh, who later publicly endorsed Madaro at a Golden Age Club luncheon.

“I’m humbled to have the mayor’s support,” said Madaro. “If I am elected, the mayor and I will have a great working relationship,” said Madaro.

In his campaign Madaro is continuing to share his vision of East Boston and “my priorities and what I would like to do for our community.”

“I have been campaigning full time for four months and I’m not going to stop,” said Madaro. “I think I appeal to a number of different constituencies in East Boston and I think that was the message that resonated in the primary.”

Pomodoro has been visible on the campaign trail, notably at Wood Island MBTA Station greeting voters, campaign sign in hand. She hosted a fundraiser in late February and met with family and some supporters at Jeveli’s Restaurant for an informal event. She joined Madaro and the other candidates at the Jeffries Point Neighborhood Association forum and other events and was set to participate in a forum Tuesday night at East Boston High School.

“I’ve been sending a lot of emails, tweeting, and connecting on line with residents, just trying to be effective in that way,” said Pomodoro. “With the weather, it’s been difficult but I’ve stood outside Wood Island Station a few times.”

Pomodoro said in her campaign she has been speaking out against the rapid development of East Boston properties in to residences.

“I have a major issue with the development in East Boston,” said Pomodoro. “I feel with this gentrification issue that they’re pushing East Boston middle class right out of the area. The development is coming in and there’s a buying of property and they’re allowed to do it. They keep putting in more apartments and more condos. They’re fragmenting our community. Affordable housing is going to get pushed out because people cannot afford to buy.”

Pomodoro is a strong advocate for mental health issues. “As a therapist, I have a lot of experience on these issues. As a social worker, I not only hear the problems, I help people heal, find resource, and find answers. I’m the voice for people who are underserved and have no one else.”

Pomodoro said she’s enjoying her first campaign for elected office.

“I love people. It’s been fun meeting the voters. Some people like my energy. Some people like the fact that I am running for the people who don’t have a voice. The reason I got in this race was that I was tired of voicing my opinion about things and never getting heard.”

The following are the polling locations:

1 Samuel Adams Elementary School – 165 Webster Street, Vote In Auditorium. Voters Enter

From Left Of Main Entrance

2 Donald Mckay School – 122 Cottage Street, Vote In Cafeteria. Voter Entrance Mckay Place

3 B.H.A. Heritage Apartments – 209 Sumner Street, Vote In Community Room.

4 Paris Street Community Center – 112 Paris Street, Vote In Gymnasium.

5 Paris Street Community Center – 112 Paris Street, Vote In Gymnasium.

6 East Boston High School Gymnasium – 86 White Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance

Left Side Of Building On Brooks Street.

7 East Boston High School Gymnasium – 86 White Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance

Left Side Of Building On Brooks Street.

8 East Boston High School Gymnasium – 86 White Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance

Left Side Of Building On Brooks Street.

9 East Boston High School Gymnasium – 86 White Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance

Left Side Of Building On Brooks Street.

10 East Boston High School Gymnasium – 86 White Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance

Left Side Of Building On Brooks Street.

11 Cheverus School Apartments – 10 Moore Street, Vote In Lobby. Voter Entrance Through

Parking Lot From Chaucer Street To The Left Of The Main Entrance

12 Orient Heights Yacht Club – 61 Bayswater Street. Vote In Function Room.

13 Curtis Guild Elementary School – 5 Ashley Street, Vote In Gymnasium. Voter Entrance 195

Leyden Street To Far Right Of Building.

14 Orient Heights Housing Community Building – 38 Vallar Rd, Vote In Community Room. Voter

Cary Shuman can be reached at cary@lynnjournal.com

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