Menino’s Budget Targets Capital Spending for Eastie

April 17, 2013
By

Last week Mayor Thomas Menino submitted his Fiscal Year 2014 budget that includes capital spending in East Boston. The spending in Eastie is part of Menino’s $2.6 billion Operating Budget for FY2014 and five year $1.8 billion Capital Plan, including $196 million in new FY 2014 project authorizations.

“This year’s budget invests in our most valuable assets: our people and our neighborhoods,” said Menino said. “Today we are proposing a sound financial plan. It builds on our long history of achieving balanced budgets and at the same time improves delivery of high-quality services that Boston residents expect and deserve. The city’s resources are for all people, not just some, and so in this budget as in the nineteen before it, we invest to raise up every neighborhood.”

In Eastie, money will be spent to renovate the American Legion Playground in Eagle Hill. Since 2008, the city has appropriated anywhere from $2 to $3 million to redesign and construct new courts, playgrounds and bleachers at the park known locally as the City Yards.

With $2.3 million already appropriated for the American Legion Playground, the city saw it as an opportunity to finally build a proper soccer field in the neighborhood to address this need. The site would also include softball field, basketball courts and playground space.

Some residents have expressed disappointment that American Legion Playground, which was allowed to fall into disrepair over the past decade, would lose its identity as Eastie’s premier baseball diamond that was once home turf for East Boston High School, semipro baseball teams and East Boston Little League decades ago.

Capital spending will also be used to replace the turf field at the East Boston Stadium.

Mayor Thomas Menino talks about his proposed Fiscal Year 2014 recommended budget and five-year capital plan with members of the Boston City Council last week at City Hall.

  • AcleanerEBoston

    The City should set aside money to educate some of the residents of East Boston in Neighborhood Pride. The streets and parks are filthy and littering is a normal occurrence for some people. The few that would like a cleaner environment are far outnumbered by the litter bugs.

  • RexH

    I defy anyone from the city leadership to walk the length of Meridian Street on some morning – say, Thursday, three days after most of the trash is collected – and tell me it’s not horribly, horribly disgusting.

    It’s nice to see money being put into maintaining and renovating parks and public spaces, but seeing the way people treat their surroundings in general, it’s throwing good money after bad.

    Use it to find some general clean-ups. Use it for better/harsher enforcement (residential enforcement, at least… littering’s a tough one).

    I’m not so sure that education will work, however. If you haven’t figured out by the age of (I’ll be generous, here) 10 that thoughtless/shameless littering and generally living like an animal is uneccessary & disgusting, and lowers the profile of the neighborhood and its inhabitants… you never will.

    However, people understand sanctions, like citations and fines.

  • EastiesFinest

    You are 100% right Rex. The city doesn’t give a crap about east boston especially Meridian St. We need enforcement from the city to start ticketing those who litter and increased clean-ups from the city. Eagle Hill and East Boston deserves more from the city!

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