Selling a Church: Mt. Carmel Parishioners Face Blunt Realities

July 27, 2011
By

The Archdiocese of Boston will apparently be selling the Mt. Carmel Church building.

Mind you, it will not be selling the church itself, rather, just the land and bricks and mortar associated with the structure.

After all, how do you sell a church? Or in this case, how do you sell a church building?

It is actually very easy.

You get a real estate agent. He or she assesses the property, then the city follows by estimating what the real estate tax will be if there is a new use.

During this time the church has been stripped of all its statues and relics and any religious  accoutremont. Then a for sale sign is placed on the building and the community waits.

In all likelihood, the church will be sold to an evangelical church that will use the structure as a church. This would be the best use for the structure.

Then again, if proper parking can be assured, a real estate development might be a suitable replacement.

The bottom line – the structure has been reduced from a place of God and worship to a piece of real estate about to be put on the market.

Change is hard to take during any period of history. It is especially hard in this neighborhood where the church, since 1906, served as a beacon in the night for those seeking shelter as well as a place for weddings and funerals, christenings and religious holidays throughout the year.

It was difficult when the church closed. It has grown more difficult for all those who served the church and who were served by it for longer than a century during its relegation period.

Now the true end has finally come.

It is a bitter pill to swallow.

Nothing lasts forever – not even a church that was a worthy place of worship for so many for so long.

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